Breaking International Law for the sake of Brexit: Where on earth are we headed?

Personally, I think there are more important things to be discussing politically on here at present such as what appears to be out woeful efforts at combating and preventing the further spread of COVID-19. However, Brexit has reared its ugly head back into the public conversation recently and it prompts me to worry even more for the future of the UK. Why? Because a no-deal Brexit [Pictured above are Boris Johnson and Jean Claude Juncker last year; image from Business Insider] which last year which at the moment we appear to be heading for and which I would have labelled disastrous last year but to be coming to that scenario in the middle of a pandemic…I’m lost for words….

Why is it increasingly likely? The government brought forward the Internal Market Bill which aims to ensure that post-Brexit, the UK nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have the same standards and rules throughout. At first glance, that’s nothing contentious. It seems perfectly reasonable. However, the bill also says ‘Certain provisions to have effect notwithstanding inconsistency or incompatibility with international or other domestic law’ but also replaces parts of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement as elements of it “cease to be recognised and available in domestic law”. read more

The Far-right was out in force last weekend, our leaders are at fault, this cannot go on…

Never have I ever been as ashamed to call myself either British, English or Geordie after the scenes we saw over the weekend in what some of the media called anti-antiracist protestors descending in cities such as London [Pictured above with the image from Sky News] and Newcastle in quite frankly horrendous and embarrassing.

This was, in the immediate sense, in response to vandalism that had been seen the weekend before during the Black Lives Matter protests. The Churchill memorial had been vandalised (not for the first time), a statue of the slave trader Edward Colston as toppled in Bristol which prompted some councils to take discussions about the statues they have in their local authorities. The same Churchill memorial, as well as a host of others, had been boarded up in anticipation of another wave of protests. read more

Critique of the UK Government’s shambolic handling of the pandemic

Coronavirus. It feels a long time ago since Brexit was the big cat in the room and that was only a couple of months ago. I have been anxious to write on this topic because as someone who is at increased risk of complications if I get it (for those who don’t know, I am diabetic; that account for 26% of underlying conditions in England) it terrifies me. It literally scares the crap out of me! However, If the worst were to happen this may be my only chance to voice my concerns on it ok!

It was 23rd March when the Prime Minister announced measures that amounted to the biggest curb on our civil liberties ever in modern British history outside of wartime. The UK is on lockdown of sorts, following in the path of other European countries including France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Ireland in a bid to curb the transmission and spread of the new novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The lockdown measures are relatively lax compared to some other countries and while it was a necessary move and universally praised as a look at my Facebook feed that Monday evening suggested, it is one that I felt was overdue.

Yes, this post will be critiquing the approach the government has taken in handling this epidemic. Criticising them has not been a cool thing to do at present. As people who know me know, I am a socialist and I often get told I criticise them whatever they do, or if it were a Labour government I would not be so critical. If Labour’s record was anywhere near the record of the current government, trust me I would be saying the same. I have also seen a lot of posts saying this is not a time to be political or that Boris Johnson is doing a good job and doing the best he can. The final assertion is a fair point. Boris Johnson, we must assume is doing what he feels is the best job he can and he cannot be faulted for that. However, at this time holding the government to account, regardless of your views in an objective way (as I hope to do in this post) has never been more important… read more

General Election 2019: Boris Johnson must not win!

The first December election since 1923 is upon us and while my intents on this blog when discussing politics has to been to remain fair and impartial mostly; I have been keen in the past year to reflect the truth. Hence, the series of posts I’ve done entitled A Tory Said What. Those posts have been difficult to get on top of with the number of mistruths and spins spun by the Tory government. However, since Boris Johnson became leader in the summer the scale of mistruth and keeping up with it all has been virtually impossible.

So, with the country going to the polls, I make this impassioned plea…Please for the love of God, do not return Boris Johnson and his ‘new’ Conservative Party to Downing Street with a majority! read more

2019 General Election: Jeremy Corbyn’s Neutral Brexit Stance

As a Labour member and supporter, one thing I have been increasingly frustrated with the narrative of the party’s stance on Brexit has been portrayed. It’s confusing, it’s too complicated, they’ll argue against their own Brexit deal or they are not a Remain enough party. These are all criticisms that have been levelled at the leadership.

It is understandable. Whether you have for example Emily Thornberry on Question Time saying she’d campaign to remain in any future referendum leaving Fiona Bruce and co aghast, or Joh McDonnell on Peston refusing to say which way he’d campaign, it doesn’t add to a coherent picture. That’s why I was personally delighted to hear Jeremy Corbyn clarify it on the BBC Question Time Special debate a couple of weeks ago [Pictured above, image from ITV] when he said… read more

Lancaster House: unfulfilled promises and the national interest

 

This post has been long considered by myself. It has had many draft ideas. For example, it was nearly entitled ‘In defence of the enemies of the people’ after the backlash to the result of Gina Millar’s High Court case. However, the wording would be quite problematic as would accusing the government of being the real enemies of the people. I have decided to be above the language used by these media outlets and question who is at most damaging the national interest.

The post was aimed for publication last Wednesday to mark the year anniversary of the Lancaster House Speech though a recent family bereavement (I don't feel this is the right place to go into such detail) and dealing with it delayed its publication.

Since the 2016 Referendum regarding the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union and the ascension of Theresa May as Prime Minister vowing to deliver the ‘will of the people’, some of the language used in the press has been alarming. It has been the language of segregation, division and hate.

Judges have been labelled ‘enemies of the people’ by the Daily Mail for insisting the government needed an Act of Parliament to invoke Article 50. All other political parties, members of the House of Lords and in fact anyone that has disagreed with Mrs May have been described as ‘saboteurs’ purely for having different views on Brexit. Then, last month, a group of Conservative MP’s were named and shamed including their pictures as ‘malcontents’ for voting against the government on ensuring Parliament has a meaningful vote on the final Brexit deal reached between the UK and the EU. Though just why said newspaper quoted Nadine Dorries saying they should be ‘deselected’ is heavily ironic considering she faced calls to be sacked for going on I’m a Celebrity in 2012. read more

Brexit: Twelve weeks on…

On 24th June, the UK woke up to the result of the EU Referendum as the nation voted to leave the EU by a margin of 51.9% to 48.1%. Nigel Farage dared to dream of the victory he had been seeking for years amongst a party atmosphere and suggested calling this day Independence Day. However, for Remain voters like myself, the all-nighter was a different story. The Referendum was divisive, it had misleading claims, deceit and scaremongering but the vote was clear.

However, twelve weeks on from that day in June, where are we now? Is Brexit any nearer to reality? What has happened since? read more

EU Referendum Results: Analysis

On 23rd June, ballot stations around the United Kingdom were open for the In, Out EU Referendum promised by David Cameron in 2013. The polls opened, they closed, the votes were counted and announced as the results came in thick and fast during the early hours. For myself and many other friends of mine, the ‘All-Nighter’ was a depressing experience and for some, emotions of disgust as the UK voted to leave the EU by a margin of 51.9% to 48.1%.

You might be able to tell from my tone here and in my previous political posts that I was pro-remain. I still am all for remaining in the EU but that I not the purpose of this article and I will proceed in as neutral as humanly possible during it. If you have me on Facebook or Twitter, you will know how disappointed I was at the outcome of the Referendum and have held myself back on commenting on any possible explanations for the result until the emotions had died down. Now, almost two months on, now is the right time for me to discuss it and hopefully not lose too much of my sanity. read more

The EU Referendum: Questions and Answers

Although some are probably pig sick (evening Prime Minister) of hearing about the EU Referendum, 23rd June 2016 (tomorrow) could well and truly be a historic date that will feature in History textbooks in 50 or 100 years time! Tomorrow, the people of the United Kingdom will go to the polls and answer the question: Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union (EU) or Leave? In my last political post, I asked if my readers could forward some questions they have surrounding the Referendum. To those who did, you know who you are and I thank you! In this post, I will be answering these questions as well as some set by myself that I thought would be useful for you all to know.

When do the Polls open? read more