Breaking International Law for the sake of Brexit: Where on earth are we headed?

Personally, I think there are more important things to be discussing politically on here at present such as what appears to be out woeful efforts at combating and preventing the further spread of COVID-19. However, Brexit has reared its ugly head back into the public conversation recently and it prompts me to worry even more for the future of the UK. Why? Because a no-deal Brexit [Pictured above are Boris Johnson and Jean Claude Juncker last year; image from Business Insider] which last year which at the moment we appear to be heading for and which I would have labelled disastrous last year but to be coming to that scenario in the middle of a pandemic…I’m lost for words….

Why is it increasingly likely? The government brought forward the Internal Market Bill which aims to ensure that post-Brexit, the UK nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have the same standards and rules throughout. At first glance, that’s nothing contentious. It seems perfectly reasonable. However, the bill also says ‘Certain provisions to have effect notwithstanding inconsistency or incompatibility with international or other domestic law’ but also replaces parts of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement as elements of it “cease to be recognised and available in domestic law”. read more

The Far-right was out in force last weekend, our leaders are at fault, this cannot go on…

Never have I ever been as ashamed to call myself either British, English or Geordie after the scenes we saw over the weekend in what some of the media called anti-antiracist protestors descending in cities such as London [Pictured above with the image from Sky News] and Newcastle in quite frankly horrendous and embarrassing.

This was, in the immediate sense, in response to vandalism that had been seen the weekend before during the Black Lives Matter protests. The Churchill memorial had been vandalised (not for the first time), a statue of the slave trader Edward Colston as toppled in Bristol which prompted some councils to take discussions about the statues they have in their local authorities. The same Churchill memorial, as well as a host of others, had been boarded up in anticipation of another wave of protests. read more

A Tory Said what? June 2019

I am back with a new instalment of Tory bashing and with a new title, ‘A Tory Said What’ after a good few months away from doing this. It was a title I was going to use for the February and March posts before I missed them and this dragged on into April and May. That means I missed some mighty clangers from Conservative politicians. What did I miss?

I missed Jacob Rees Mogg seemingly defending the use of Concentration Camps during the Second Boer War; the Prime Minister telling children to go back to school as they went on strike over climate change as well as Jeremy Hunt forgetting his history in Slovakia. That was just February. March saw more embarrassment for the government as Theresa May offered herself up as the sacrificial lamb only for enough of her MPs to vote down the Withdrawl Agreement again in Meaningful Vote Three. Then, in came the vultures prying around her job which continued through April and have not yet stopped as she eventually announced her resignation at the end of May. read more

Shocking and Surprising comments from Tory MP’s: January 2019.

I am back with another one of these Tory bashing posts where I dismantle some of the more shocking, surprising and alarming comments made by Government MP’s. At the third time of asking, I think I have come to a title for this series of posts that I like and it is the one above.

January was not a good month for the Conservatives. As a Government committed to delivering Brexit, 118 of their own MP’s voted down their flagship policy to help inflict the largest parliamentary defeat for a government in British history; 230 vote majority. They then saved their skin to survive a vote of no confidence motion that could have triggered a General Election. That said, it wasn’t a great month for other parties too with Labour having an MP sent to prison and a Scottish MP making controversial claims surrounding Winston Churchill but that could make for a separate post altogether. read more

Shocking and Surprising comments from Conservative MP’s: December 2018

The first post in this monthly series of posts did not go so well. It was not even published until mid-December. The original post also only had a working title (*Comments you Probably would not have expected a Government/Tory MP to say: November 2018) which has since been shortened down to the above. Granted, this is also a later post but then a part of that has been down to me adjusting to the new set up on Word Press which has been a slightly frustrating process. 

The purpose of these posts is to highlight the level of hypocrisy in the comments sprouted by government ministers. Seeing as the government is a Conservative minority one, but allows me to do something that I enjoy doing; Toy bashing. Would these posts happen in the event of a Labour government? Who knows but I don’t have to think about that until 2022 by which time I may not be doing this blog anymore. read more

Lancaster House: unfulfilled promises and the national interest

 

This post has been long considered by myself. It has had many draft ideas. For example, it was nearly entitled ‘In defence of the enemies of the people’ after the backlash to the result of Gina Millar’s High Court case. However, the wording would be quite problematic as would accusing the government of being the real enemies of the people. I have decided to be above the language used by these media outlets and question who is at most damaging the national interest.

The post was aimed for publication last Wednesday to mark the year anniversary of the Lancaster House Speech though a recent family bereavement (I don't feel this is the right place to go into such detail) and dealing with it delayed its publication.

Since the 2016 Referendum regarding the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union and the ascension of Theresa May as Prime Minister vowing to deliver the ‘will of the people’, some of the language used in the press has been alarming. It has been the language of segregation, division and hate.

Judges have been labelled ‘enemies of the people’ by the Daily Mail for insisting the government needed an Act of Parliament to invoke Article 50. All other political parties, members of the House of Lords and in fact anyone that has disagreed with Mrs May have been described as ‘saboteurs’ purely for having different views on Brexit. Then, last month, a group of Conservative MP’s were named and shamed including their pictures as ‘malcontents’ for voting against the government on ensuring Parliament has a meaningful vote on the final Brexit deal reached between the UK and the EU. Though just why said newspaper quoted Nadine Dorries saying they should be ‘deselected’ is heavily ironic considering she faced calls to be sacked for going on I’m a Celebrity in 2012. read more

2017 Snap General Election: The Manifesto Comparison

 

I have been away awhile from this blog whilst working on job applications and in general taking a well-needed break. However, with Britain going back to the polls in a surprise General Election this week; there feels like no time like the present to get back into it…

In this post, as the title suggests, I will be comparing the election manifesto’s put forward by the two parties most likely to be in government come the morning of 9th June. That means it is a straight comparison of the Labour and Conservative Parties in the battle for the keys of Number 10 Downing Street.

Whilst I can be accused of being narrow-minded in only comparing these two parties and not a broad range as you have seen in the TV debates; I do have my reasons:
1. Since the EU referendum last year, UKIP have been a farce electing a new leader in Diane James before she lasted only 18 days in the job before resigned. However, even with a newly established leader in Paul Nuttall (who seems to want the job), they are now a spent force and their timing of their manifesto launch could not have been anymore distasteful; within 48 hours of the Manchester Arena attack.
2. Plaid Cymru and the Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP) only contest seats in Wales and Scotland respectively. Whilst the SNP won the majority of the seats in Scotland back in 2015; they do not contest enough seats to win a majority and therefore very unlikely to be in government
3. The Green Party finished the 2015 election with an almost equal share of the vote as UKIP but like the SNP and Plaid Cymru, they don’t have a realistic chance of being involved in government.
4. The Liberal Democrats under the leadership of Tim Farron were originally going to be a part of this comparison but my mind was easily altered after reading just the first two pages of their Manifesto. Farron was brutally honest in his assessment and deserves credit for that in admitting the party are unlikely to win the election and are merely competing to be the official opposition. However, for the sake of this comparison, I am not going to cover a party who is not aiming to win. read more

NHS…National Health Crisis

 

I have certainly been overdue a political rant having not posted a political post since the Labour leadership election last September. So, when the headlines were discussing the state of the NHS in January, I thought there’ll be no better time to bring that barren spell to an end. However, I delayed the publication of this post in the hope of receiving a response to a Freedom of Information Request to ensure a more accurate post around the availability of hospital beds. I feel the time has now come to publish my views regardless after being sent on a wild goose chase between the Department of Health and the NHS England Press team with no solid reply. Once I had made that decision, the publication was delayed further as my target publication date was the day of the Westminister terror attack and it did not feel right to launch into a political rant at that time. It is long overdue but I hope you find it an interesting read...

I am pretty sure you will have seen the words Red Cross, NHS and humanitarian crisis in the same headlines back in January. This came into being after Mike Adamson, Chief Executive of the British Red Cross claimed to be ‘on the front line…responding to the humanitarian crisis all in our hospital and ambulance services across the country’.

mike Adamson of the british red cross made headlines in january likening the NHS to a humanitarian crisis [image from the Third sector]
Mike Adamson of the British red cross made headlines in January likening the NHS to a humanitarian crisis [image from the Third sector]

The Red Cross were deployed to aid the ‘East Midlands Ambulance service on New Years Day in the following cities: Nottingham, Leicester, Lincoln, Kettering and Northampton. Adamson’s comments came after it was reported that two patients died while waiting on emergency trolleys at Worcestershire Royal Hospital well in excess of the targeted 4 hours waiting time in Accident and Emergencies (A&E). read more

Brexit: Twelve weeks on…

On 24th June, the UK woke up to the result of the EU Referendum as the nation voted to leave the EU by a margin of 51.9% to 48.1%. Nigel Farage dared to dream of the victory he had been seeking for years amongst a party atmosphere and suggested calling this day Independence Day. However, for Remain voters like myself, the all-nighter was a different story. The Referendum was divisive, it had misleading claims, deceit and scaremongering but the vote was clear.

However, twelve weeks on from that day in June, where are we now? Is Brexit any nearer to reality? What has happened since? read more