A Tory Said What: March 2021

March was a big month in politics. The clocks went forward and the MPs left Parliament for their Easter break but they are still busy. There is still the pandemic and restrictions started to be eased but it was not without controversy, questionable comments and even more corruption. That is why I am back with a new post of A Tory Said What.

So, what is the point of these posts and why am I publishing them? Well, do you ever feel like the Conservative Government [PM Boris Johnson pictured above; feature image from Manchester Evening News] are deliberately lying to you? Do you ever feel like they are deliberately trying to gaslight you? Questioning your sanity? Or, have they said something that sounds so bizarre that has you thinking what the f***, they surely could not have said it, read more

A Tory Said What: January 2021

A new year is underway and while I initially aimed for this month to be the first one back for the ‘A Tory Said What’ series of posts, it is the second since I decided to start doing these posts again.

These posts were originally halted as it was immensely difficult to keep up with the number of lies, misinformation that was spread, especially after the rise of Boris Johnson to Prime Minister [Pictured in the feature image above from Manchester Evening News]. However, I then remember this quote from Joe Biden’s inspirational inauguration speech on January 20th and it reminds me why the amount of lies, misinformation and gaslighting from the Government infuriates me so much, especially while we are stick with ‘Britain Trump’ for the foreseeable… read more

Critique of the UK Government’s shambolic handling of the pandemic

Coronavirus. It feels a long time ago since Brexit was the big cat in the room and that was only a couple of months ago. I have been anxious to write on this topic because as someone who is at increased risk of complications if I get it (for those who don’t know, I am diabetic; that account for 26% of underlying conditions in England) it terrifies me. It literally scares the crap out of me! However, If the worst were to happen this may be my only chance to voice my concerns on it ok!

It was 23rd March when the Prime Minister announced measures that amounted to the biggest curb on our civil liberties ever in modern British history outside of wartime. The UK is on lockdown of sorts, following in the path of other European countries including France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Ireland in a bid to curb the transmission and spread of the new novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The lockdown measures are relatively lax compared to some other countries and while it was a necessary move and universally praised as a look at my Facebook feed that Monday evening suggested, it is one that I felt was overdue.

Yes, this post will be critiquing the approach the government has taken in handling this epidemic. Criticising them has not been a cool thing to do at present. As people who know me know, I am a socialist and I often get told I criticise them whatever they do, or if it were a Labour government I would not be so critical. If Labour’s record was anywhere near the record of the current government, trust me I would be saying the same. I have also seen a lot of posts saying this is not a time to be political or that Boris Johnson is doing a good job and doing the best he can. The final assertion is a fair point. Boris Johnson, we must assume is doing what he feels is the best job he can and he cannot be faulted for that. However, at this time holding the government to account, regardless of your views in an objective way (as I hope to do in this post) has never been more important… read more

A Tory Said what? June 2019

I am back with a new instalment of Tory bashing and with a new title, ‘A Tory Said What’ after a good few months away from doing this. It was a title I was going to use for the February and March posts before I missed them and this dragged on into April and May. That means I missed some mighty clangers from Conservative politicians. What did I miss?

I missed Jacob Rees Mogg seemingly defending the use of Concentration Camps during the Second Boer War; the Prime Minister telling children to go back to school as they went on strike over climate change as well as Jeremy Hunt forgetting his history in Slovakia. That was just February. March saw more embarrassment for the government as Theresa May offered herself up as the sacrificial lamb only for enough of her MPs to vote down the Withdrawl Agreement again in Meaningful Vote Three. Then, in came the vultures prying around her job which continued through April and have not yet stopped as she eventually announced her resignation at the end of May. read more

Boris and his leadership debate no shows!


My feeling about them is that they are essential, the viewers, the public does need to see interchange between their potential leaders. And I think the way for politicians to allay their anxieties about leadership debates is to have as many of them as possible, so you can make a cock up in one of them and say something sensible in the next and that is the way to do it’.

Those were the words of Boris Johnson, the front runner in the race to replace Theresa May as our next Prime Minister. Yet, the former foreign secretary and current MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip was the only one of the then six remaining candidates (Andrea Leadsom, Esther McVey and Mark Harper had already been eliminated while Matt Hancock withdrew after the first round) not to show up for the first televised debate on Channel 4 last weekend. He has since refused to attend a lobby debate in Westminister and a Sky News televised debate yesterday. Channel 4 did not cancel and subsequently unseated him; leaving a podium empty to mark his absence but why did he not attend? read more

2017 Snap General Election: The Manifesto Comparison

 

I have been away awhile from this blog whilst working on job applications and in general taking a well-needed break. However, with Britain going back to the polls in a surprise General Election this week; there feels like no time like the present to get back into it…

In this post, as the title suggests, I will be comparing the election manifesto’s put forward by the two parties most likely to be in government come the morning of 9th June. That means it is a straight comparison of the Labour and Conservative Parties in the battle for the keys of Number 10 Downing Street.

Whilst I can be accused of being narrow-minded in only comparing these two parties and not a broad range as you have seen in the TV debates; I do have my reasons:
1. Since the EU referendum last year, UKIP have been a farce electing a new leader in Diane James before she lasted only 18 days in the job before resigned. However, even with a newly established leader in Paul Nuttall (who seems to want the job), they are now a spent force and their timing of their manifesto launch could not have been anymore distasteful; within 48 hours of the Manchester Arena attack.
2. Plaid Cymru and the Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP) only contest seats in Wales and Scotland respectively. Whilst the SNP won the majority of the seats in Scotland back in 2015; they do not contest enough seats to win a majority and therefore very unlikely to be in government
3. The Green Party finished the 2015 election with an almost equal share of the vote as UKIP but like the SNP and Plaid Cymru, they don’t have a realistic chance of being involved in government.
4. The Liberal Democrats under the leadership of Tim Farron were originally going to be a part of this comparison but my mind was easily altered after reading just the first two pages of their Manifesto. Farron was brutally honest in his assessment and deserves credit for that in admitting the party are unlikely to win the election and are merely competing to be the official opposition. However, for the sake of this comparison, I am not going to cover a party who is not aiming to win. read more

NHS…National Health Crisis

 

I have certainly been overdue a political rant having not posted a political post since the Labour leadership election last September. So, when the headlines were discussing the state of the NHS in January, I thought there’ll be no better time to bring that barren spell to an end. However, I delayed the publication of this post in the hope of receiving a response to a Freedom of Information Request to ensure a more accurate post around the availability of hospital beds. I feel the time has now come to publish my views regardless after being sent on a wild goose chase between the Department of Health and the NHS England Press team with no solid reply. Once I had made that decision, the publication was delayed further as my target publication date was the day of the Westminister terror attack and it did not feel right to launch into a political rant at that time. It is long overdue but I hope you find it an interesting read...

I am pretty sure you will have seen the words Red Cross, NHS and humanitarian crisis in the same headlines back in January. This came into being after Mike Adamson, Chief Executive of the British Red Cross claimed to be ‘on the front line…responding to the humanitarian crisis all in our hospital and ambulance services across the country’.

mike Adamson of the british red cross made headlines in january likening the NHS to a humanitarian crisis [image from the Third sector]
Mike Adamson of the British red cross made headlines in January likening the NHS to a humanitarian crisis [image from the Third sector]

The Red Cross were deployed to aid the ‘East Midlands Ambulance service on New Years Day in the following cities: Nottingham, Leicester, Lincoln, Kettering and Northampton. Adamson’s comments came after it was reported that two patients died while waiting on emergency trolleys at Worcestershire Royal Hospital well in excess of the targeted 4 hours waiting time in Accident and Emergencies (A&E). read more