Breaking International Law for the sake of Brexit: Where on earth are we headed?

Personally, I think there are more important things to be discussing politically on here at present such as what appears to be out woeful efforts at combating and preventing the further spread of COVID-19. However, Brexit has reared its ugly head back into the public conversation recently and it prompts me to worry even more for the future of the UK. Why? Because a no-deal Brexit [Pictured above are Boris Johnson and Jean Claude Juncker last year; image from Business Insider] which last year which at the moment we appear to be heading for and which I would have labelled disastrous last year but to be coming to that scenario in the middle of a pandemic…I’m lost for words….

Why is it increasingly likely? The government brought forward the Internal Market Bill which aims to ensure that post-Brexit, the UK nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have the same standards and rules throughout. At first glance, that’s nothing contentious. It seems perfectly reasonable. However, the bill also says ‘Certain provisions to have effect notwithstanding inconsistency or incompatibility with international or other domestic law’ but also replaces parts of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement as elements of it “cease to be recognised and available in domestic law”. read more

My objection to the ‘rewriting history’ argument and narrative

‘I think it’s time we stopped our cringey embarrassment about our history, about our traditions and about our culture. And we stop this general bout of self-recrimination and wetness’.

The decision by the BBC to play only an instrumental version of the songs ‘Land of Hope and Glory’ and Rule Brittania’ at the Last Night of the Proms. Of course, since the story ran at the start of the week it has brought about a rage of fury from those who would argue against ‘wokeness’ or that in some way we are erasing our history. That was a sentiment shared by the Prime Minister [Pictured above; Image from BBC] back in May when protestors vandalised the Winston Churchill memorial, as are the words in the above quote read more

The Far-right was out in force last weekend, our leaders are at fault, this cannot go on…

Never have I ever been as ashamed to call myself either British, English or Geordie after the scenes we saw over the weekend in what some of the media called anti-antiracist protestors descending in cities such as London [Pictured above with the image from Sky News] and Newcastle in quite frankly horrendous and embarrassing.

This was, in the immediate sense, in response to vandalism that had been seen the weekend before during the Black Lives Matter protests. The Churchill memorial had been vandalised (not for the first time), a statue of the slave trader Edward Colston as toppled in Bristol which prompted some councils to take discussions about the statues they have in their local authorities. The same Churchill memorial, as well as a host of others, had been boarded up in anticipation of another wave of protests. read more

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter! Of course, all lives do matter but they don’t all matter until black lives matter. If you don’t agree with that statement, you will not like the contents of this post and I would kindly ask you to look elsewhere.

This has taken a lot of thought even before the protests weekend before last. I was conflicted over it having been critical of others for not adhering to lockdown restrictions such as the Prime Minister’s Chief Advisor Dominic Cummings which I wrote a post on and also criticised people for flocking to the beaches on the South Coast the other weekend. Consequently, I was initially anxious about supporting the Black Lives Matter movement and the reasons so many were protesting at this time would make me look like a hypocrite. However, I hate racism. read more

Cummings must go but the damage is done…

Bank Holiday weekend was explosive for political news with the stories surrounding the Prime Ministers Special Advisor Dominic Cummings [Image above from The Times] and his alleged breaching of lockdown rules.

It started with a joint story from The Guardian and The Mirror newspapers that broke late on Friday evening alleging that Cummings and his family were spotted in Durham on April 12th with the police having previously visited his parents household. It was followed by a whole day of Cummings denying any wrongdoing and government ministers lining up to defend him publicly. Then came the second story from the two papers alleging he was spotted in Barnard Castle on April 12th. When these stories broke, I was furious and the anger I feel is still there in the public.  read more

Critique of the UK Government’s shambolic handling of the pandemic

Coronavirus. It feels a long time ago since Brexit was the big cat in the room and that was only a couple of months ago. I have been anxious to write on this topic because as someone who is at increased risk of complications if I get it (for those who don’t know, I am diabetic; that account for 26% of underlying conditions in England) it terrifies me. It literally scares the crap out of me! However, If the worst were to happen this may be my only chance to voice my concerns on it ok!

It was 23rd March when the Prime Minister announced measures that amounted to the biggest curb on our civil liberties ever in modern British history outside of wartime. The UK is on lockdown of sorts, following in the path of other European countries including France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Ireland in a bid to curb the transmission and spread of the new novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The lockdown measures are relatively lax compared to some other countries and while it was a necessary move and universally praised as a look at my Facebook feed that Monday evening suggested, it is one that I felt was overdue.

Yes, this post will be critiquing the approach the government has taken in handling this epidemic. Criticising them has not been a cool thing to do at present. As people who know me know, I am a socialist and I often get told I criticise them whatever they do, or if it were a Labour government I would not be so critical. If Labour’s record was anywhere near the record of the current government, trust me I would be saying the same. I have also seen a lot of posts saying this is not a time to be political or that Boris Johnson is doing a good job and doing the best he can. The final assertion is a fair point. Boris Johnson, we must assume is doing what he feels is the best job he can and he cannot be faulted for that. However, at this time holding the government to account, regardless of your views in an objective way (as I hope to do in this post) has never been more important… read more

Boris Johnson’s Prorogation and the affront to Democracy

The doors have been locked! Parliament has now been officially shut down by Boris Johnson’s government and will not be re-opened again until the 14th October for a new Queens Speech. It is a far cry from what the Prime Minister said during his leadership election campaign…

I would like to make it absolutely clear that I am not attracted tp arcane procedures such as the prorogation f parliament. As someone who aspires to be the Prime Minister of a democratic nation, I believe in finding consensus in the House of Commons read more

A Tory Said What: August 2019

August and with MPs on their summer recess from Parliament, I would have expected this post to be pretty short. You would have imagined there was less time for any government MP to say something factually incorrect, alarming or concerning which is what these posts aim to do. However, with Boris Johnson as Prime Minister that was probably never going to happen. In fact, I could probably get a post just out of his comments alone.

So, what were the highlights for the government? The latest Q2 figures show that the economy shrunk meaning at the time we were only three months away from being in a recession; by the time this is published around two months away. The new Home Secretary Priti Patel tried to come out hard on immigration with plans for strict immigration rules and an end to free movement in the event of a no-deal Brexit. August ended with a constitutional crisis of sorts with Boris Johnson deciding to prorogue parliament in a bid to undemocratically force through a no-deal Brexit (more on that later). read more

A Tory Said what? June 2019

I am back with a new instalment of Tory bashing and with a new title, ‘A Tory Said What’ after a good few months away from doing this. It was a title I was going to use for the February and March posts before I missed them and this dragged on into April and May. That means I missed some mighty clangers from Conservative politicians. What did I miss?

I missed Jacob Rees Mogg seemingly defending the use of Concentration Camps during the Second Boer War; the Prime Minister telling children to go back to school as they went on strike over climate change as well as Jeremy Hunt forgetting his history in Slovakia. That was just February. March saw more embarrassment for the government as Theresa May offered herself up as the sacrificial lamb only for enough of her MPs to vote down the Withdrawl Agreement again in Meaningful Vote Three. Then, in came the vultures prying around her job which continued through April and have not yet stopped as she eventually announced her resignation at the end of May. read more

Boris and his leadership debate no shows!


My feeling about them is that they are essential, the viewers, the public does need to see interchange between their potential leaders. And I think the way for politicians to allay their anxieties about leadership debates is to have as many of them as possible, so you can make a cock up in one of them and say something sensible in the next and that is the way to do it’.

Those were the words of Boris Johnson, the front runner in the race to replace Theresa May as our next Prime Minister. Yet, the former foreign secretary and current MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip was the only one of the then six remaining candidates (Andrea Leadsom, Esther McVey and Mark Harper had already been eliminated while Matt Hancock withdrew after the first round) not to show up for the first televised debate on Channel 4 last weekend. He has since refused to attend a lobby debate in Westminister and a Sky News televised debate yesterday. Channel 4 did not cancel and subsequently unseated him; leaving a podium empty to mark his absence but why did he not attend? read more